1st Place Winner BCI Award 2018: Restoring Functional Reach-to-Grasp in a Person with Chronic Tetraplegia using Implanted FES and Intracortical BCIs

A. Bolu Ajiboye and Robert F. Kirsch of Case Western Reserve University, USA, in collaboration with Leigh R. Hochberg of Harvard Medical School and Brown University, USA, won 1st place at the BCI Award 2018 with their work “Restoring Functional Reach-to-Grasp in a Person with Chronic Tetraplegia using Implanted Functional Electrical Stimulation and Intracortical Brain-Computer Interfaces“.…

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“The Performance Cortex: How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius” by Zach Schonbrun

BrainGate2 research by Bolu Ajiboye, PhD and Robert Kirsch, PhD is prominently featured in chapter nine of the recently published book, The Performance Cortex: How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius by Zach Schonbrun. Whether it is timing a 95 mph fastball or reaching for a coffee mug, movement requires a complex suite of computations that many take…

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When Your Bladder or Bowels Control Your Life

Everybody has to go. For those of us with neurological conditions like spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or even complications from a stroke, you can often feel tethered to the toilet. In fact, bladder and bowel control consistently rank among the most important functions to regain among people living with spinal cord injury, according to…

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Brain Implant Allows Man to Feel Touch on Robotic Hand

At the end of Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, Luke Skywalker feels when a needle pricks his newly-installed bionic hand. Researchers report today in the journal Science Translational Medicine that they can do something similar: stimulating regions of a human test subject’s brain with electrodes can recreate the perception of touch in a robotic hand. Read…

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Implanted Neuroprosthesis Improves Walking Ability in Stroke Patient

Tue, 05/31/2016 – 11:54am by American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation A surgically implanted neuroprosthesis—programmed to stimulate coordinated activity of hip, knee, and ankle muscles—has led to substantial improvement in walking speed and distance in a patient with limited mobility after a stroke, according to a single-patient study in the American Journal of Physical…

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